The psychology of property division is crucial to the process

| Nov 23, 2014 | Prenuptial Agreements |

Property division is a critical factor in every divorce, and sometimes it can be one of the most difficult and argument-inducing factors as well. The financial accounts; the money; the property, such as homes or land; the objects, such as furniture and vehicles; all of these things get thrown on the chopping block and the two splitting spouses need to work it out.

Now, in many cases, the spouses are able to agree on some of the assets right away, which is good. However, many times the spouses can’t agree on who deserves what share of a certain asset. This can lead to arguing and legal action, neither of which is necessarily productive for the spouses.

We bring all of this up in the hopes to shed some light on the psychology of property division. Each spouse in a divorce is going to have his or her idea of how their assets are going to be divided. And that idea is probably no where close to the idea that his or her spouse has for the same assets. At the same time, each spouse is going to communicate differently; each spouse has his or her own emotions and feelings wrapped up in the divorce; each spouse will deal with the situation differently.

It’s important to realize this, whether you are a newlywed or someone going through a divorce. Effective communication is vital in a divorce. In can prevent legal fights, lost time and lost money.

Ultimately, one of the best ways to deal with property division is to head it off before your wedding day. A prenuptial agreement can deal with the assets a couple brings to the marriage, and outline rules and regulations for how those assets are divided in case of a divorce.

Source: American Psychological Association, “That’s mine! Property division in divorce,” ve M. Brank and Amanda B. Hussein, Nov. 2012

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