Many people who think about prenuptial agreements — if they ever do think about prenups — might be inclined to regard them in age-old and stereotypical ways.

As in the way they might typically be portrayed in a movie, for example.

Some of our readers in Georgia and elsewhere might readily conjure up a scene like this, for instance: The impoverished and about-to-be-wed young woman is standing by her impending husband’s pool near the west wing of his sprawling mansion when she is suddenly descended upon by a coterie of advisers requesting her signature on an agreement they say is a prerequisite to marriage.

That depiction underscores what many people think a marital contract is all about: protection of great wealth against the potential that it can be taken at some future point by another party.

“The affluent playboy marrying the meter maid” is how such a prenup-related scenario is otherwise described by one commentator on marital agreements.

That person also notes, though, that prenuptial agreements “have grown up.”

That means this: The utility of prenuptial and postnuptial contracts has greatly expanded to help fill the specialized needs of people who have amassed some degree of wealth and are marrying for a second or subsequent time. Marital contracts are also being executed in ever-higher numbers by baby boomer-aged persons who have important commitments to children from a former marriage,

The requirements attached to marital contracts to ensure their legality can differ widely among states. A Georgia resident with questions or concerns about a prenuptial agreement or postnuptial contract can obtain guidance and legal help from an experienced Atlanta-based family law attorney.