Stay-at-home moms: interesting trends, family law considerations

| Apr 15, 2014 | Family Law |

So-called “stay-at-home” moms were far from being a rarity across the United States in previous generations. Indeed, they comprised the norm, with most women remaining at home to manage the household and care for children in lieu of entering the work force.

In fact, it is estimated that only about 37 percent of women between the ages of 25 and 54 worked outside the home in 1950, for a number of reasons (including, notably, cultural constraints and sexual stereotypes).

That low number rose steadily in subsequent decades, with about 77 percent of women with children working outside the home by 1999.

And now, the number is slipping back down, according to a report recently issued by the Pew Research Center.

In other words, more women are again back at home with the kids, at the same time that more women generally are seeking work or already actively engaged in the work force.

There is a certain irony in this. Economically, times continue to be tough for many Americans, people across the country are looking for work, and yet stay-at-home moms are on the rise.

Why?

Researchers make this notable point: Many of the moms at home want to work, yet can’t afford to do so, given the prohibitively high costs of child care.

As a recent CNN article on the subject notes, “The more typical stay-at-home mom in America today is poor.”

This certainly has a number of family law ramifications, including potential considerations focused upon child support, spousal maintenance, custody and additional matters.

It also begs this question: Should more women who are purposefully opting to forgo careers out of an absolute need to stay home and provide for children be considering prenuptial agreements?

Divorcing stay-at-home moms might reasonably have a number of family law-related concerns that they need to discuss and resolve. In Georgia, they can obtain answers and solid legal representation from an experienced Atlanta-based divorce attorney who serves clients throughout the state.

Source: CNN Money, “Stay-at-home moms are on the rise,” Annalyn Kurtz, April 8, 2014

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